Belle II detector rolled-in

On 11 April, the Belle II detector was successfully “rolled-in” to the collision point of the upgraded SuperKEKB accelerator, marking an important milestone.

“Roll-in” involves moving the entire 8 m-tall, 1400 tonne Belle II detector system from its assembly area to the beam-collision point 13 m away. The detector is now integrated with SuperKEKB and all its seven subdetectors, except for the innermost vertex detector, are in place. The next step is to install the complex focusing magnets around the Belle II interaction point. SuperKEKB achieved its first turns in February 2016, with operation of the main rings scheduled for early spring and phase-III “physics” operation by the end of 2018.

Compared to the previous Belle experiment, and thanks to major upgrades made to the former KEKB collider, Belle II will allow much larger data samples to be collected with much improved precision. After six years of gruelling work with many unexpected twists and turns, it was a moving and gratifying experience for everyone on the team to watch the Belle II detector move to the interaction point, says Belle II spokesperson Tom Browder. Flavour physics is now the focus of much attention and interest in the community and Belle II will play a critical role in the years to come.

The detector roll-in was broadcast live on the Japanese web casting service NicoNico. About 36,000 people watched the live stream; a number of viewers posted questions and comments on the NicoNico interface to the panelists sitting in the Belle II control room.  A number of famous physicists were interviewed remotely. These included three Japanese Nobelists: Kajita (2015 Physics Nobel Prize), Kobayashi and Maskawa (2008 Physics Nobel Prize). In addition, the well-known string theorist Hiroshi Ooguri (joint appointment at Caltech in Pasadena, California and the Kavli/IPMU Instiute in Kashiwa-no-ha, Japan) came to Tsukuba Hall to congratulate the Belle II team and discuss the role of Belle II in future breakthroughs in fundamental particle physics in a long and engaging interview broadcast on the NicoNico network. In addition, the mayor of Tsukuba along with the mascot of Tsukuba city, Captain Hookun, a rather unique combination of an owl and a robotic astronaut,  also visited the Belle II control room on floor B3 of Tsukuba Hall.

The detector roll-in was broadcast live on the Japanese web casting service NicoNico. About 36,000 people watched the live stream; a number of viewers posted questions and comments on the NicoNico interface to the panelists sitting in the Belle II control room.  A number of famous physicists were interviewed remotely. These included three Japanese Nobelists: Kajita (2015 Physics Nobel Prize), Kobayashi and Maskawa (2008 Physics Nobel Prize). In addition, the well-known string theorist Hiroshi Ooguri (joint appointment at Caltech in Pasadena, California and the Kavli/IPMU Instiute in Kashiwa-no-ha, Japan) came to Tsukuba Hall to congratulate the Belle II team and discuss the role of Belle II in future breakthroughs in fundamental particle physics in a long and engaging interview broadcast on the NicoNico network. In addition, the mayor of Tsukuba along with the mascot of Tsukuba city, Captain Hookun, a rather unique combination of an owl and a robotic astronaut,  also visited the Belle II control room on floor B3 of Tsukuba Hall.

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